The universal statement will read, "There is a town where all men are clean shaven." Notice that the modifying sentence and the word 'only' are missing from the universal statement.
   The paradox is solved, and now, we can move the tale of the barber out of Ispace and into three dimensional reality.
    Bertrand Russell realized that this paradox was not difficult.

"You can define the barber as 'one who shaves all those, and those only, who do not shave themselves.' The question is, does the barber shave himself? In this form the contradiction is not very difficult to solve. — Bertrand Russell, The Philosophy of Logical Atomism."14

Russell's Paradox

    The confusions, intricacies, and complexities of infinity can be realized in Russell's paradox.    What is Russell's paradox? The following quote explains it.

   "Russell's Paradox is the most famous of the logical or set-theoretical paradoxes. Also known as the Russell-Zermelo paradox, the paradox arises within na´ve set theory by considering the set of all sets that are not members of themselves. Such a set appears to be a member of itself if and only if it is not a member of itself. Hence the paradox.
   "Some sets, such as the set of all teacups, are not members of themselves. Other sets, such as the set of all non-teacups, are members of themselves. Call the set of sets that are not members of themselves 'R.' If R is a member of itself, then by definition it must not be a member of itself. Similarly, if R is not a member of itself, then by definition it must be a member of itself."15

    A simpler way to understand this is if sets can contain themselves, then the Set of all Sets whether finite or infinite, must be able to contain itself, because it is itself a set; however, when the Set of all Sets, shares the property of the sets that do not contain themselves, then the Set of all Sets must contain itself, but it cannot contain itself. And the paradox is recognized.

           
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